Seaplane PTS

 

 

Introduction to the Practical Test Standards (PTS) for the ASES add-on Rating

What is the PTS? What is its purpose? Why is it important that you become intimately familiar with the requirements listed in the PTS?

If you are one of the pilots coming to Alaska for your float rating it may be the first time in a long time that you have had to deal with a FAA checkride. Quite a few of the pilots who received their certificates prior to the publishing of the PTS have never heard of it. Those of you who have recently received your certificate or just added a rating to it should already be aware of the significance of the PTS.


What is the PTS?
It is a publication by the FAA that is regulatory in nature that sets the minimum standards of the knowledge, skills, and abilities you are required to know and demonstrated in order to earn your SES rating. “You may have heard the PTSs billed as a textual description of the worst pilot you can be….” (Quoted section from January 2008 Designee Update Letter.)

What is its purpose?
To simplify and make it easier for you as a pilot, for me as an instructor, and the DPE (Designated Pilot Examiner) performing your checkride to understand Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 61, section 43, which sets the requirements for each certificate or rating.

Why is it important to you? You might think of it as your flight plan route. Without one you might get lost. The Operations and Tasks outlined in the PTS are your check points along the route that you must cross over to get to your destination --- the Seaplane rating. Knowing and understanding the requirements in the PTS prevents any misunderstanding on your part when you finally get to the DPE. It eases the burden on your instructor. It makes your experience more fun and more efficient.

Here’s one more very important point. You’ve heard the cliché “Knowledge is Power.” Knowledge of the PTS makes you aware of what the DPE by regulation is required to check. You know what your responsibilities are and the minimums you must demonstrate and perform.

If your DPE fails to completely and thoroughly follow the guidelines in the PTS, he or she has failed you, your family and friends who may be hurt or killed, and the entire aviation community if you have an accident based on the fact that you didn’t develop the skills required of a safe pilot and that the DPE failed to catch it. The system has failed. It is a matter of trust.


As a pilot examiner it is my mandated responsibility, trusted to me by the FAA to evaluate your knowledge, skills, and abilities based upon the standards listed in the PTS for the certificate or rating you are seeking. Only after successfully demonstrating all of the tasks listed in the various operations do I have the authority to issue you a SES rating.

I have provided you with an abbreviated copy of the FAA Practical Test Standard (PTS) for the ASES rating and links to the Advisory Circulars (AC) listed as references under each operation listed in the PTS.

Also, prior to beginning your study of the ASES PTS, and so you will understand my instructions from the FAA and their attitude regarding checkrides by DPEs, I am asking for you to please read the following article.

Excerpted from the January 2008 Designees Update Newsletter.

 
HOLDING THE LINE
(PRACTICAL TEST STANDARDS INTEGRITY AND DISCIPLINE)
 

As instructors, we are familiar with the evaluation process and know it is an important tool for measuring how much our students have learned. We also use that process in identifying and eliminating deficiencies in their training. However, as instructors, we may evaluate only about 10 percent of the time. The rest of the time we are introducing new tasks, reviewing the ones previously accomplished, and practicing those tasks until our students are able to meet or exceed the Practical Test Standards (PTS). Unfortunately for those of us who like to instruct, when we assume the role of the evaluators, we are prohibited from instruction. We can ask questions, set up scenarios, or request that an applicant demonstrate a maneuver then evaluate their answers or actions. We can provide instruction only in the debriefing and only when the outcome of the test has been determined to be satisfactory or unsatisfactory.

Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 61, section 43, defines what is expected of the applicant in a practical test. It states that they have to perform the task specified in the areas of operation for the certificate or rating sought, and be able to meet the approved standards. They must also demonstrate mastery of the aircraft with the successful outcome of each task performed never seriously in doubt; and if they fail any area of operation, that they fail the practical test. As a Designated Pilot Examiners (DPE), you have the responsibility to administer and evaluate the applicant to determine whether they were able to meet those standards.

You may have heard the PTSs billed as a textual description of the worst pilot that should be out in the National Airspace System (NAS). When I was an Assistant Chief at a 141 flight school, I used this analogy often to make the point that our instructors should train an applicant for a new certificate or rating to a standard that exceeds the PTS.

That analogy made even more sense in the fall of 2004, when I went to work at the Oklahoma City Flight Standards District Office (FSDO) as an Aviation Safety Inspector (ASI). As an Inspector, I was amazed at the number of accidents, incidents, and occurrences that happened on a regular basis. It seemed that these reports came across my desk daily. There were pilot deviations including: runway incursions, climbing through an assigned altitude, and not following Air Traffic Control (ATC) instructions. When the weather was nice, in the spring and summer months, a weekly buzzing event was inevitable as well as gear-up landings, pilot assists, Visual Flight Rule (VFR) pilots caught in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC), and landing accidents due to loss of control.

The list goes on. Most ended with either an enforcement action in the form of suspension, re-examination under Title 49 USC Sec. 44709, a warning letter, or remedial training. The good news was that most of these people were not hurt, but a few were not so lucky. The point was hammered home to me the first time I helped investigate a fatal accident. If there was a positive side of this tragedy, it was that no one else occupied the other five seats. It was then that I realized how important our jobs are as Inspectors and DPEs.

DPEs have long been referred to as the “Gate Keepers,” because the DPE holds the key to the final gate that the applicant has to pass through before they can be allowed, unsupervised into the NAS. It is the last chance that we will have to evaluate an airman’s knowledge, skills, and abilities; and if needed, refer them back to a flight instructor to correct deficiencies.

Unfortunately, we have all been in a position where we probably passed an applicant that in the back of our mind was the proverbial “accident looking for a place to happen.” They met the standards, but you just had a gut feeling about their actual competency.

If you ever have that feeling, before you fill out the temporary certificate, ask yourself a couple of hard questions: 1.) Would you allow your close friend or loved one (who is not a pilot) to fly with this applicant? 2.) Would you feel comfortable if the applicant (who is a newly-minted Private Pilot, with the ink barely dry on their temporary certificate) decided to load up his family in a high-performance single-engine airplane for a 2-day trip across the Rocky Mountains to Anaheim, California? Remember that it is those people who are counting on you to administer a good, valid practical test.

Don’t let them down.

Todd Burk, Aviation Safety Inspector
Designee Standardization Branch, AFS-640


For the complete newsletter click on this link to FAA web site: http://www.faa.gov /other_visit/aviation_industry/designees_delegations/designee_news/designee _updates/media/2008/2008_01_update.pdf

 

 

FAA Private and Commercial Seaplane Pilot
Practical Test Standards edited by Vern
 

NOTE: For your convenience while preparing for your check ride, I have included this excerpt of the Single Engine Sea add-on requirements from the FAA’s Private Pilot Practical Test Standards. For complete PTS go to:http://www.faa.gov/education_research/testing/airmen/test_standards/pilot/media/FAA-S-8081-14A.pdf (If the link doesn’t work, copy and paste this to your browser address bar or Google it.)

There are some minor differences in the Commercial and Private pilot standards when adding the SES to your certificate. (Commercial requirements when different are red and in parentheses.)

To add a SES rating to a Private pilot certificate with an ASEL rating, you must meet the minimum standards for these Areas Operations and Tasks.

Note: after each task is the FAA recommended reference for study and preparation.

These practical test standards are based on the following references. They can be found at this web site
: www.faa.gov .

14 CFR part 43 Maintenance, Preventive Maintenance, Rebuilding, and Alteration

14 CFR part 61 Certification: Pilots, Flight Instructors, and Ground Instructors

14 CFR part 91 General Operating and Flight Rules

AC 00-6 Aviation Weather

AC 00-45 Aviation Weather Services

FAA-H-8083-25A Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge

AC 61-65 Certification: Pilots and Flight Instructors

AC 61-67 Stall and Spin Awareness Training.

AC 61-84 Role of Preflight Preparation

AC 90-48 Pilots’ Role in Collision Avoidance

AC 90-66 Recommended Standard Traffic Patterns and Practices for Aeronautical Operations At Airports Without Operating Control Towers

 

AC 91-69 Seaplane Safety for FAR Part 91 Operations

AC 120-51 Crew Resource Management Training

FAA-H-8083-1 Aircraft Weight and Balance Handbook



FAA-H-8083-3A Airplane Flying Handbook

 

FAA-H-8083-23 Seaplane, Skiplane, and Float/Ski Equipped Helicopter Operations Handbook

 

FAA-H-8083-15 Instrument Flying Handbook



AIM Aeronautical Information Manual

AFD Airport Facility Directory

NOTAMs Notices to Airmen

Other Pilot Operating Handbook FAA-Approved Flight Manual

Navigation Charts

Seaplane Supplement

I have included “special emphasis tasks” that as an examiner are part of the “other areas deemed appropriate” to the rating being tested. Task items in green are of special importance.

Special Emphasis Areas
Examiners shall place special emphasis upon areas of aircraft operations considered critical to flight safety. Among these are:
1. positive aircraft control;
2. procedures for positive exchange of flight controls (who is flying the airplane);
3. stall/spin awareness;
4.
collision avoidance;
5. wake turbulence avoidance;
6. Land and Hold Short Operations (LAHSO);
7. runway incursion avoidance;
8. controlled flight into terrain (CFIT);
9.
aeronautical decision making (ADM);
10. checklist usage; and
11. other areas deemed appropriate to any phase of the practical test.


Areas of operation

I. PREFLIGHT PREPARATION:
Tasks: F. G. H.

II. PREFLIGHT PROCEDURES: (NOTE: This is a special emphasis area)
Tasks: All

III. AIRPORT AND SEAPLANE BASE OPERATIONS
:
Tasks: All

IV. TAKEOFFS, LANDINGS, AND GO-AROUNDS:
Task; A, B, D E, F, G, H, I, J,

X. EMERGENCY OPERATIONS: (Comm. IX: A, B,)
Tasks; A, B

XII. POSTFLIGHT PROCEDURES: (Comm. XI: B, C, D)
Tasks; All


FAA-S-8081-14A

Private Pilot Practical Test Standards for Airplane SES

FOREWORD
The Private Pilot—Airplane Practical Test Standards (PTS) book has been published by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to establish the standards for private pilot certification practical tests for the airplane category, single-engine land and sea; and multiengine land and sea classes.

FAA inspectors and designated pilot examiners shall conduct practical tests in compliance with these standards. Flight instructors and applicants should find these standards helpful during training and when preparing for the practical test.
/s/ 4/23/2002

Joseph K. Tintera, Manager
Regulatory Support Division
Flight Standards Service


Single Engine Sea abbreviated PTS Operations and Tasks

I . AREA OF OPERATION: PREFLIGHT PREPARATION

F. TASK: PERFORMANCE AND LIMITATIONS (ASEL and ASES)

REFERENCES: AC 61-23/FAA-H-8023-23, FAA-H-8083-1, AC 61-84, POH/AFM.

Objective. To determine that the applicant:

1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to performance and limitations by explaining the use of charts, tables, and data to determine performance and the adverse effects of exceeding limitations.

2. Computes weight and balance. Determines the computed weight and center of gravity is within the airplane’s operating limitations and if the weight and center of gravity will remain within limits during all phases of flight.

3. Demonstrates use of the appropriate performance charts, tables, and data.

4. Describes the effects of atmospheric conditions on the airplane's performance.

FAA-S-8081-14A 1-4


G. TASK: OPERATION OF SYSTEMS (ASEL and ASES)


REFERENCES: AC 61-23; FAA-H-8083-25A; FAA-H-8023-23; POH/AFM.

Objective. To determine that the applicant exhibits knowledge of the elements related to the operation of systems on the airplane provided for the flight test by explaining at least three (3) (Comm. 5) of the following systems.

1. Primary flight controls and trim.
2. Flaps, leading edge devices, and spoilers.
3. Water rudders (ASES).
4. Powerplant and propeller.
5. Landing gear.
6. Fuel, oil, and hydraulic.
7. Electrical.
8. Avionics
9. Pitot-static vacuum/pressure and associated flight instruments.
10. Environmental.
11. Deicing and anti-icing.

 

H. TASK: WATER AND SEAPLANE CHARACTERISTICS (ASES)

REFERENCE: FAA-H-8023-23.

Objective. To determine that the applicant exhibits knowledge of the elements related to water and seaplane characteristics by explaining:

1. The characteristics of a water surface as affected by features, such
as—
a. size and location.
b. protected and unprotected areas.
c. surface wind.
d. direction and strength of water current.
e. floating and partially submerged debris.
f. sandbars, islands, and shoals.
g. vessel traffic and wakes.
h. other features peculiar to the area.

2. Float and hull construction, and their effect on seaplane performance.

3. Causes of porpoising and skipping, and the pilot action required to prevent or correct these occurrences.
1-5 FAA-S-8081-14A

I. TASK: SEAPLANE BASES, MARITIME RULES, AND AIDS TO MARINE NAVIGATION (ASES)

REFERENCES: FAA-H-8083-23; AIM.

Objective. To determine that the applicant exhibits knowledge of the elements related to seaplane bases, maritime rules, and aids to marine navigation by explaining:

1. How to locate and identify seaplane bases on charts or in directories.

2. Operating restrictions at various bases.

3. Right-of-way, steering, and sailing rules pertinent to seaplane operation.

4. Marine navigation aids such as buoys, beacons, lights, and sound signals.


II. AREA OF OPERATION: PREFLIGHT PROCEDURES

A. TASK: PREFLIGHT INSPECTION (ASEL and ASES)

REFERENCES: FAA-H-8083-23; POH/AFM. Objective. To determine that the applicant:

1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to preflight inspection. This shall include which items must be inspected, the reasons for checking each item, and how to detect possible defects.

2. Inspects the airplane with reference to an appropriate checklist.

3. Verifies the airplane is in condition for safe flight.


B. TASK: COCKPIT MANAGEMENT (ASEL and ASES)

REFERENCES: FAA-H-8083-3A; POH/AFM.

Objective. To determine that the applicant:

1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to cockpit management procedures.

2. Ensures all loose items in the cockpit and cabin are secured.

3. Organizes material and equipment in an efficient manner so they are readily available.

4. Briefs occupants on the use of safety belts, shoulder harnesses, doors, and emergency procedures.


C. TASK: ENGINE STARTING (ASEL and ASES)
(Note: When flying seaplanes, this task is very important!)

REFERENCES: FAA-H-8083-3A, AC 61-23; FAA-H-8083-25A, AC 91-13, AC 91-55; POH/AFM.

Objective. To determine that the applicant:

1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to recommended engine starting procedures. This shall include the use of an external power source,

hand propping safety, and starting under various atmospheric conditions.

2. Positions the airplane properly considering structures, surface conditions, other aircraft, and the safety of nearby persons and property.

3. Utilizes the appropriate checklist for starting procedure.

E. TASK: TAXIING AND SAILING (ASES)

REFERENCES: FAA-H-8083-23; USCG NAVIGATION RULES, INTERNATIONAL-INLAND; POH/AFM.

Objective. To determine that the applicant:

1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to water taxi and sailing procedures.

***2. Positions the flight controls properly for the existing wind conditions.

3. Plans and follows the most favorable course while taxi or sailing considering wind, water current, water conditions and maritime regulations.

4. Uses the appropriate idle, plow, or step taxi technique.

***5. Uses flight controls, flaps, doors, water rudder, and power correctly so as to follow the desired course while sailing.

6. Prevents and corrects for porpoising and skipping.

7. Avoids other aircraft, vessels, and hazards.

8. Complies with seaplane base signs, signals, and clearances.

*** (emphasis added by VK)

F. TASK: BEFORE TAKEOFF CHECK (ASEL and ASES)

REFERENCES: FAA-H-8083-23; POH/AFM.

Objective. To determine that the applicant:

1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to the before takeoff check. This shall include the reasons for checking each item and how to detect malfunctions.

2. Positions the airplane properly considering other aircraft/vessels, wind and surface conditions.

3. Divides attention inside and outside the cockpit.

4. Ensures that engine temperature and pressure are suitable for runup and takeoff.

5. Accomplishes the before takeoff checklist and ensures the airplane is in safe operating condition.

6. Reviews takeoff performance airspeeds, takeoff distances, departure, and emergency procedures.

7. Avoids runway incursions and/or ensures no conflict with traffic prior to taxiing into takeoff position.


IV. AREA OF OPERATION: TAKEOFFS, LANDINGS, AND GO AROUNDS

A. TASK: NORMAL AND CROSSWIND TAKEOFF AND CLIMB (ASEL and ASES)

NOTE: If a crosswind condition does not exist, the applicant's knowledge of crosswind elements shall be evaluated through oral testing.

REFERENCES: FAA-H-8083-23; POH/AFM.

Objective. To determine that the applicant:

1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to a normal and crosswind takeoff, climb operations, and rejected takeoff procedures.

***2. Positions the flight controls for the existing wind conditions.

3. Clears the area; taxies into the takeoff position and aligns the airplane on the runway center/takeoff path.

4. Retracts the water rudders, as appropriate, (ASES) and advances the throttle smoothly to takeoff power.

***5. Establishes and maintains the most efficient planing/lift-off attitude and corrects for porpoising and skipping (ASES).

6. Lifts off at the recommended airspeed and accelerates to VY.

7. Establishes a pitch attitude that will maintain VY +10/-5 knots. (Comm. VY,+/-5 knots.)

8. Retracts the landing gear, if appropriate, and flaps after a positive rate of climb is established. (You better not have your landing gear down in the water.)

9. Maintains takeoff power and VY +10/-5 knots to a safe maneuvering altitude.
(Call out, “positive rate, flaps up.")

10. Maintains directional control and proper wind-drift correction throughout the takeoff and climb.

11. Complies with noise abatement procedures.

12. Completes the appropriate checklist.

1-11 FAA-S-8081-14A

B. TASK: NORMAL AND CROSSWIND APPROACH AND LANDING (ASEL and ASES)


NOTE: If a crosswind condition does not exist, the applicant's knowledge of crosswind elements shall be evaluated through oral testing.

REFERENCES: FAA-H-8083-23; POH/AFM.

Objective. To determine that the applicant:

1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to a normal and crosswind approach and landing.

2. Adequately surveys the intended landing area (ASES).
(Look, Think, Choose & Apply.)

3. Considers the wind conditions, landing surface, obstructions, and selects a suitable touchdown point.

4. Establishes the recommended approach and landing configuration and airspeed, and adjusts pitch attitude and power as required.

5. Maintains a stabilized approach and recommended airspeed, or in its absence, not more than 1.3 VSO, +10/-5 knots, with wind gust factor applied. (Comm. 1.3 VSO, +/-5 knots.)

6. Makes smooth, timely, and correct control application during the roundout and touchdown.

7. Contacts the water at the proper pitch attitude (ASES).

8. Touches down smoothly at approximate stalling speed (ASEL).

9. Touches down at or within 400 feet (120 meters) beyond a specified point, with no drift, and with the airplane's longitudinal axis aligned with and over the runway center/landing path. (Comm. within 200 feet (60 meters).)

10. Maintains crosswind correction and directional control throughout the approach and landing sequence.

11. Completes the appropriate checklist.

FAA-S-8081-14A 1-12

E. TASK: SHORT-FIELD TAKEOFF (CONFINED AREA—ASES) AND MAXIMUM PERFORMANCE CLIMB (ASEL and ASES)

REFERENCES: FAA-H-8083-23; POH/AFM.

Objective. To determine that the applicant:

1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to a short-field (confined area ASES) takeoff and maximum performance climb.

2. Positions the flight controls for the existing wind conditions; sets the flaps as recommended.

3. Clears the area; taxies into takeoff position utilizing maximum available takeoff area and aligns the airplane on the runway center/takeoff path.

4. Selects an appropriate take off path for the existing conditions (ASES).

5. Applies brakes (if appropriate), while advancing the throttle smoothly to takeoff power.

6. Establishes and maintains the most efficient planing/lift-off attitude and corrects for porpoising and skipping (ASES).

7. Lifts off at the recommended airspeed, and accelerates to the recommended obstacle clearance airspeed or VX.

8. Establishes a pitch attitude that will maintain the recommended obstacle clearance airspeed, or VX,+10/-5 knots, until the obstacle is cleared, or until the airplane is 50 feet (20 meters) above the surface. (Comm. VX,,+5/-0 knots.)

9. After clearing the obstacle, establishes the pitch attitude for VY, accelerates to VY, and maintains VY, +10/-5 knots, during the climb. (Comm. VY, +/-5 knots.)

10. Retracts the landing gear, if appropriate, and flaps after clear of any obstacles or as recommended by manufacturer.

11. Maintains takeoff power and VY +10/-5 to a safe maneuvering altitude.
(Comm. VY +/-5 knots.)

12. Maintains directional control and proper wind-drift correction throughout the takeoff and climb.

13. Completes the appropriate checklist.
1-15 FAA-S-8081-14A

F. TASK: SHORT-FIELD APPROACH (CONFINED AREA—ASES) AND LANDING (ASEL and ASES)

REFERENCES: FAA-H-8083-23; POH/AFM.

Objective. To determine that the applicant:

1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to a short-field (confined area ASES) approach and landing.

2. Adequately surveys the intended landing area (ASES).
(Look, Think Choose & Apply.)

3. Considers the wind conditions, landing surface, obstructions, and selects the most suitable touchdown point.

4. Establishes the recommended approach and landing configuration and airspeed; adjusts pitch attitude and power as required.

5. Maintains a stabilized approach and recommended approach airspeed, or in its absence not more than 1.3 VSO, +10/-5 knots, with wind gust factor applied. (Comm. 1.3 VSO, +/-5 knots.)

6. Makes smooth, timely, and correct control application during the roundout and touchdown.

7. Selects the proper landing path, contacts the water at the minimum safe airspeed with the proper pitch attitude for the surface conditions (ASES).

8. Touches down smoothly at minimum control airspeed (ASEL).

9. Touches down at or within 200 feet (60 meters) beyond a specified point, with no side drift, minimum float and with the airplane's longitudinal axis aligned with and over the runway center/landing path. (Comm. 100 feet (30 meters).)

10. Maintains crosswind correction and directional control throughout the approach and landing sequence.

11. Applies brakes, (ASEL) or elevator control (ASEs), as necessary, to stop in the shortest distance consistent with safety.

12. Completes the appropriate checklist.
FAA-S-8081-14A 1-16

G. TASK: GLASSY WATER TAKEOFF AND CLIMB (ASES)

NOTE: If a glassy water condition does not exist, the applicant shall be evaluated by simulating the TASK.

REFERENCES: FAA-H-8083-23; POH/AFM.

Objective. To determine that the applicant:

1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to glassy water takeoff and climb.

2. Positions the flight controls and flaps for the existing conditions.

3. Clears the area; selects an appropriate takeoff path considering surface hazards and/or vessels and surface conditions
.
4. Retracts the water rudders as appropriate; advances the throttle smoothly to takeoff power.

5. Establishes and maintains an appropriate planing attitude, directional control, and corrects for porpoising, skipping, and increases in water drag.

6. Utilizes appropriate techniques to lift seaplane from the water considering surface conditions.

7. Establishes proper attitude/airspeed, and accelerates to VY, +10/-5 knots during the climb. (Comm. VY, +/-5 knots during the climb.)

8. Retracts the landing gear, if appropriate, and flaps after a positive rate of climb is established.

9. Maintains takeoff power VY +10/-5 to a safe maneuvering altitude.
(Comm. VY +/-5 knots.)

10. Maintains directional control and proper wind-drift correction throughout takeoff and climb.

11. Completes the appropriate checklist.
1-17 FAA-S-8081-14A

H. TASK: GLASSY WATER APPROACH AND LANDING (ASES)

NOTE: If a glassy water condition does not exist, the applicant shall be evaluated by simulating the TASK.

REFERENCES: FAA-H-8083-23; POH/AFM.

Objective. To determine that the applicant:

1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to glassy water approach and landing.

2. Adequately surveys the intended landing area.

3. Considers the wind conditions, water depth, hazards, surrounding terrain, and other watercraft.

4. Selects the most suitable approach path, and touchdown area.

5. Establishes the recommended approach and landing configuration and airspeed, and adjusts pitch attitude and power as required.

6. Maintains a stabilized approach and the recommended approach airspeed, +10/-5 knots and maintains a touchdown pitch attitude (Comm. +/-5 knots) and descent rate from the last altitude reference until touchdown.

7. Makes smooth, timely, and correct power and control adjustments to maintain proper pitch attitude and rate of descent to touchdown.

8. Contacts the water in the proper pitch attitude, and slows to idle taxi speed.

9. Maintains crosswind correction and directional control throughout the approach and landing sequence.

10. Completes the appropriate checklist.
FAA-S-8081-14A 1-18


I. TASK: ROUGH WATER TAKEOFF AND CLIMB (ASES)


NOTE: If a rough water condition does not exist, the applicant shall be evaluated by simulating the TASK.

REFERENCES: FAA-H-8083-23; POH/AFM.

Objective. To determine that the applicant:

1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to rough water takeoff and climb.

2. Positions the flight controls and flaps for the existing conditions.

3. Clears the area; selects an appropriate takeoff path considering wind, swells surface hazards and/or vessels.

4. Retracts the water rudders as appropriate; advances the throttle smoothly to takeoff power.

5. Establishes and maintains an appropriate planing attitude, directional control, and corrects for porpoising, skipping, or excessive bouncing.

6. Lifts off at minimum airspeed and accelerates to VY, +10/-5 knots before leaving ground effect.

7. Retracts the landing gear, if appropriate, and flaps after a positive rate of climb is established. (Comm. VY +/-5 knots.)

8. Maintains takeoff power VY +10/-5 to a safe maneuvering altitude. (Comm VY +/-5 knots.)

9. Maintains directional control and proper wind-drift correction throughout takeoff and climb.

10. Completes the appropriate checklist.
1-19 FAA-S-8081-14A

J. TASK: ROUGH WATER APPROACH AND LANDING (ASES)


NOTE: If a rough water condition does not exist, the applicant shall be
evaluated by simulating the TASK.

REFERENCES: FAA-H-8083-23; POH/AFM.

Objective. To determine that the applicant:

1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to rough water approach and landing.

2. Adequately surveys the intended landing area.

3. Considers the wind conditions, water, depth, hazards, surrounding terrain, and other watercraft.

4. Selects the most suitable approach path, and touchdown area.

5. Establishes the recommended approach and landing configuration and airspeed, and adjusts pitch attitude and power as required.

6. Maintains a stabilized approach and the recommended approach airspeed, or in its absence not more than 1.3 VSO +10/-5 knots with wind gust factor applied. (Comm. 1.3 VSO +/-5 knots.)

7. Makes smooth, timely, and correct power and control application during the roundout and touchdown.

8. Contacts the water in the proper pitch attitude, and at the proper airspeed, considering the type of rough water.

9. Maintains crosswind correction and directional control throughout the approach and landing sequence.

10. Completes the appropriate checklist.

The Tasks "K" and "L" are not specified in the SES add on rating; However as a working pilot I feel it is essential that you become proficient by practicing and doing them.

K. TASK: FORWARD SLIP TO A LANDING (ASEL and ASES)

REFERENCES: FAA-H-8083-3A; POH/AFM.

Objective. To determine that the applicant:

1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to forward slip to a landing.

2. Considers the wind conditions, landing surface and obstructions, and selects the most suitable touchdown point.

3. Establishes the slipping attitude at the point from which a landing can be made using the recommended approach and landing configuration and airspeed; adjusts pitch attitude and power as required.

4. Maintains a ground track aligned with the runway center/landing path and an airspeed, which results in minimum float during the roundout.

5. Makes smooth, timely, and correct control application during the recovery from the slip, the roundout, and the touchdown.

6. Touches down smoothly at the approximate stalling speed, at or within 400 feet (120 meters) beyond a specified point, with no side drift, and with the airplane's longitudinal axis aligned with and over the runway center/landing path.

7. Maintains crosswind correction and directional control throughout the approach and landing sequence.

8. Completes the appropriate checklist.

L. TASK: GO-AROUND/REJECTED LANDING (ASEL and ASES)

REFERENCES: FAA-H-8083-23; POH/AFM.

Objective. To determine that the applicant:

1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to a go-around/rejected landing.

2. Makes a timely decision to discontinue the approach to landing.

3. Applies takeoff power immediately and transitions to climb pitch attitude for VY, and maintains VY+10/-5 knots.

4. Retracts the flaps as appropriate.

5. Retracts the landing gear, if appropriate, after a positive rate of climb is established.

6. Maneuvers to the side of the runway/landing area to clear and avoid conflicting traffic.

7. Maintains takeoff power VY +10/-5 to a safe maneuvering altitude.

8. Maintains directional control and proper wind-drift correction throughout the climb.

9. Completes the appropriate checklist.
1-21 FAA-S-8081-14A


The following areas are required.

X. AREA OF OPERATION: EMERGENCY OPERATIONS

A. TASK: EMERGENCY APPROACH AND LANDING (SIMULATED) (ASEL and ASES)

REFERENCES: FAA-H-8083-3A; FAA-H-8023-23; POH/AFM.

Objective. To determine that the applicant:

1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to emergency approach and landing procedures.

2. Analyzes the situation and selects an appropriate course of action.

3. Establishes and maintains the recommended best-glide airspeed, ±10 knots.
(Comm. same.)

4. Selects a suitable landing area.

5. Plans and follows a flight pattern to the selected landing area considering altitude, wind, terrain, and obstructions.

6. Prepares for landing, or go-around, as specified by the examiner.
(Usually we will go all the way to the water.)

7. Follows the appropriate checklist.

B. TASK: SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT MALFUNCTIONS (ASEL and ASES)


REFERENCES: FAA-H-8083-3A; FAA-H-8023-23; POH/AFM.

Objective. To determine that the applicant:

1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to system and equipment malfunctions appropriate to the airplane provided for the practical test.

2. Analyzes the situation and takes appropriate action for simulated emergencies appropriate to the airplane provided for the practical test for at

least three (3) of the following— (Comm. at least five (5) --- )

a. partial or complete power loss.

b. engine roughness or overheat.

c. carburetor or induction icing.

d. loss of oil pressure.

e. fuel starvation.

f. electrical malfunction

g. vacuum/pressure, and associated flight instruments malfunction.

h. pitot/static.

i. landing gear or flap malfunction.

j. inoperative trim.

k. inadvertent door or window opening.

l. structural icing.

m. smoke/fire/engine compartment fire.

n. any other emergency appropriate to the airplane.


3. Follows the appropriate checklist or procedure.


XII. AREA OF OPERATION: POSTFLIGHT PROCEDURES

NOTE: The examiner shall select TASK A and for ASES applicants at least one other TASK.

A. TASK: AFTER LANDING, PARKING, AND SECURING (ASEL and ASES)

REFERENCES: FAA-H-8083-23; POH/AFM.

Objective. To determine that the applicant:

1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to after landing, parking and securing procedures.

2. Maintains directional control after touchdown while decelerating to an appropriate speed.

3. Observes runway hold lines and other surface control markings and lighting.

4. Parks in an appropriate area, considering the safety of nearby persons and property.

5. Follows the appropriate procedure for engine shutdown.

6. Completes the appropriate checklist.

7. Conducts an appropriate postflight inspection and secures the aircraft.


B. TASK: ANCHORING (ASES)

REFERENCES: FAA-H-8083-23; POH/AFM.

Objective. To determine that the applicant:

1.Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to anchoring.

2. Selects a suitable area for anchoring, considering seaplane movement, water depth, tide, wind, and weather changes.

3. Uses an adequate number of anchors and lines of sufficient strength and length to ensure the seaplane's security.
FAA-S-8081-14A 1-36

C. TASK: DOCKING AND MOORING (ASES)

REFERENCES: FAA-H-8083-23; POH/AFM.

Objective. To determine that the applicant:

1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to docking and mooring.

2. Approaches the dock or mooring buoy in the proper direction considering speed, hazards, wind, and water current.

3. Ensures seaplane security.

D. TASK: RAMPING/BEACHING (ASES)

REFERENCES: FAA-H-8083-23; POH/AFM.

Objective. To determine that the applicant:

1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to ramping/beaching.

2. Approaches the ramp/beach considering persons and property, in the proper attitude and direction, at a safe speed, considering water depth, tide, current and wind.

3. Ramps/beaches and secures the seaplane in a manner that will protect it from the harmful effect of wind, waves, and changes in water level.


NOTE: Comments in green are mine to assist you in preparation for your check ride.

Any omissions or errors in this excerpt are completely mine. To be assured of accuracy go to the www.faa.gov website. Every effort and a great deal of time has gone into making sure this abbreviated PTS is accurate.

To err is human.
Vern

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